The Suburban Gothic in American Popular Culture - Bernice M. Murphy

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Bernice M. Murphy - The Suburban Gothic in American Popular Culture ebook

The first sustained examination of the depiction of American suburbia in gothic and horror films, television and literature from 1948 to the present day. Beginning with Shirley Jackson's The Road Through the Wall , Murphy discusses representative texts fr



Film Theory & Criticism Film: Styles & Genres Literary Studies: From C 1900 - Literary Studies: General Popular Culture Television

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